Wednesday, 29 February 2012

iamamiwhoami –Sever/Drops

 New album and visual art project on the way...


iamamiwhoami, the mysterious art pop ‘project’ has returned with some teasers from a rumoured album release in June. ‘Sever’ was available to view online a couple of weeks ago; after a few listens, I now adore it muchly and she sounds not unlike Cerys Matthews at times in this one.  

The rather catchy ‘Drops’ appeared today and picks up with Jonna the ‘beauty’ dancing with her invisible ‘beast’. Who knows what these videos are about but the tunes are good, pure electronica; they are both well worth a listen so decide for yourselves.


Singer/songwriter Jonna Lee clearly likes things to link and each video seems to contain numerically related images; these new videos showing perhaps a thematic innocence as Jonna is clad in white and cavorts with, for want of a better word, a sasquatch?  As some of the previous audio/visual treats featured so much woodland, maybe she dragged one back just for her slightly gaga imaginings.  Anyway, could this symbolise her own demons or is it some comment on nature and purity and in no way an avant-garde attempt at remaking ‘Bigfoot and the Hendersons’ circa 1987.


I’m sure the audio/visual releases to come will clear this up and, you never know, maybe she’ll buy herself a dress to celebrate.  These are quirky tunes with varying degrees of arty good or perhaps nonsensical visuals, all pointing towards a talented mistress of bonkers creativity. I lovelovelove her voice and the beeps are good. Enjoy.


Friday, 24 February 2012

Drive - 2011 directed by Nicolas Winding Refn (spoilery)





'Be My Second At Thunder Road' (Kenickie)

Yes move over John Carpenter, whatever Blade Runner soundtrack. I can’t be the only person in the world that was praying for just one Kenickie or Zuko quote from the mysterious and nameless, silver jacketed ‘Driver’ (Ryan Gosling). 









How many shots in this seriously noir film highlighted the Scorpion on his back (the name and symbol used by the rival gang of the T-birds of course, led by Cratorface), they even drove up Thunder Road and the scary comic strip face man (John Perlman) referenced a ‘pussymobile’ partially mirroring the motor mechanic workshop 'pussy wagon' build up to that lightning song, albeit a little more crudely than in the musical hit Grease. If you look closely at this film, it is an intricate web of retrospective, half Tarantino-esque bloodied headshots all leading back to John Travolta or Jeff Conaway. Stay with me on this. I think Nicolas Winding Refn was a fan. This really isn’t sarcasm; I want to know…chewing on a matchstick with a signature jacket protagonist? Yes maybe a touch Clint Eastwood too.


I did enjoy this film but my main criticism was that it was too self-consciously cool in places, too self-consciously retro and consequently having flicked through a few reviews, too self-consciously reviewed too which I kind of find off putting. It is quite simply a brooding hero that drives, with a great synth soundtrack, a love interest; nothing deep or meaningful, it touches briefly on the intricacies of mob mentality, family loyalty and abuse especially when Nino cries of his bullying family and fear of them as it all descends into ‘Reservoir Dogs’ stylistic blood shed. This film, thankfully, wasn’t heavy handed on the Hollywood front though and does stand out in its thrilling genre with an edgier Scandinavian starkness, particularly with a lack of any humour and sparse dialogue which could spiral it into ‘cult’ territory.


Carey Mulligan’s talents were not stretched in this one as Irene; quite sweet, good American accent, I won’t go as far as compare her to Olivia Newton John; she’s had better roles to be fair. This was never a film that would have a strong role in it for a woman anyway, briefly supported by Christina Hendricks' Blanche, who basically carried a bag and had her head blown off (thankfully missing her ample chest, imagine the mess that would have made). 



Could a matriarch have been put in to bang a few badly behaved heads together? No, not really as it would have made it more mainstream ‘gangster’ and notably, there was no sex at all either, no rescue of a super glamorous ‘moll’, more a quiet anti climax as you learn ‘the girl is safe’ and he, guess what, drives off. More anti-action than action movie.

There was a brief foray into some sort of gentleman’s club which was one of the best clips of suspenseful violence for me, holding a bullet between a man’s eyes, hammer in hand, surrounded by stock still topless women with glazed expressions, an interesting image and far cry from the usual strip joint staged, often with a snake or some titillation which would normally have ended in more screaming and more bouncing body parts. 

You can’t really ignore the violence in this one, the lift scene, let’s just say, a little more than a ruckus, again was interesting, shot a touch mutely with their first impassioned kiss after at least a hundred lingering pauses of resistance, ended with some foot on squelching head action. The contrast of the kiss and the brutality was impinging and affective at revealing the polar sides of this silent ‘Driver’. The romantic with a fatal flaw, it would take forever to discuss whether this is really a male or female fantasy.

The ending? Well in my mind, he saves the girl and drives off, a sort of happily but unhappily anti- fairytale ever after ending. I liked that. It could look rather ambiguous though and if you jump here, talk of whether it was a metaphorical death of the 'Driver' has been mentioned. However, this has been cleared up by the director himself with this;

"Well all my films always have open endings. All of them. Because I believe art is always best when…you talk about it and think about it, so forth. Maybe once in awhile I’ve gone too far, but I always believe in finding the right balance. And in ‘Drive’ he lives on for more and new adventures."


Now on DVD so go get it if you’re not too squeamish, it’s the sort of excessive violence that after the first shock, desensitises as you numbly watch more blood splatter. There’s great use of music especially if your thing is retro electronic beep.  Admittedly, the synopsis to this film made me think The Fall Guy does Grand Theft Auto, rest assured it’s better than that.  My final point, very importantly, Ryan Gosling has the look of a young Nicholas Lyndhurst in many shots, try not to let this distract you.


Now listen to a tune from the most talked about soundtrack for a while, well maybe in the circles I keep anyway…






Jump here for the trailer although bear in mind, I don't think it does the film justice.

*With thanks to my brother who has the propensity to make me watch a film I wouldn't shake a very long stick at normally... I enjoyed it. x *

Tuesday, 21 February 2012

The Woman in Black – directed by James Watkins/Script Jane Goldman




Based on the novel and subsequent stage play by Susan Hill, this 2012 adaptation to film was a lot of fun, classic ghostie tricks, loud bangs, unexpected banshee like shrieks, creepy toys, dark corners and a self moving rocking chair no less. 





I am no Hammer Horror aficionado but I think this film did what Hammer does best; an archetypal, somewhat old fashioned British ghost story, no sex, no gore; all quite refreshing with unpredictable nature in the form of fatalistic marshes, dangerous tides and trees that whisper, scary villagers warnings and creepy children, dead and alive. Please, please leave this one alone Hollywood.


Maybe not having seen any Harry Potter films (I’ve never flown either, I know, shocking) gave me a slight advantage on the Radcliffe post-Potter critique front but I did however slightly snigger when he got on an authentic choo choo train, obviously minus a school uniform.





If there’s one thing Susan Hill’s ghosts are, it is vengeful, bitter and they don’t let up; the film portrayed this wonderfully and even if you know the book inside out, the atmosphere did keep you in suspense. And of course, Jane Goldman’s script tweaked it somewhat, something you have to just accept otherwise you would never see a film after reading a book without leaving the cinema enraged.


Location wise it was perfect, the grimly oppressive village, the misty causeway to the isolated Eel Marsh House that’s stunningly dark grandeur had the imposition of a haunted house; formulaic maybe as are Susan Hill stories if you’ve read any of her others, but if it works, so be it. 



Cast wise, a see of British actors from a variety of televisual and film backgrounds, all good but with nobody really stealing the show so to speak, perhaps maybe the glassy eyed pallor of assorted dismal curse ridden children.





The ending is, well I think it was softened, trying hard not to give it away now, kind of faithful to the original story in tone and outcome but not so in finer detail…I taught this book a few years back and it would lend well to a discursive essay on tragedy and finality and which ending could be seen as more so in respect of death and spirituality.  The overall feel in this story was loyally kept in the dark vein of the impossibility of any resting in peace, the wicked of the earth bound lingering on the other side to wreak more revenge and cruelty as punishment.

If there’s an ounce of goth in you anywhere, you will want to raid the Hammer props cupboard after seeing this film and engage in some dark side feng shui. Resplendent jump factor and first rate spookiness set in a museum of creepy childhood indeed, admittedly I do prefer the book but a worthwhile film nevertheless.




Leading Cast:

Daniel Radcliffe - Arthur Kipps
Ciaran Hines - Sam Daily
Janet McTeer - Elizabeth Daily
Sophie Stuckey - Stella Kipps
Misha Handley - Joseph Kipps
Liz White - Jennet Humfrye
Jessica Raine - Joseph's nanny




Related Post:
The Small Hand by Susan Hill: Book Review

Monday, 20 February 2012

Nightlife: 'Radio' EP out now



Nightlife is another duo embodying the new talents Darin Rajabian and Caroline Myrick.  If you like very pure pop in a glitzy like Goldfrapp or Glass Candy way, this could be for you.

A synth melodic combination of new wavey 80’s slightly notched up without jumping on any cringe worthy bandwagons or regurgitating the past.It’s rather euro disco inspired without the trash and heralding from Michigan, the side of the pond that a diverse range of electronic music seems to be emanating of late.

The latest EP ‘Radio’ has been out since October 2011 and is definitely worth checking out. Jump on the feel good video below for ‘On The Run’, the opening track which bursts with pop appealingly dulcet vocals gently yielding to shimmering synths.



The six-track EP unfolds with delectable and uncomplicated hook laden tunes, no surprises but an aural pleasure and light homage to pop if feeling a teensy bit bogged down with all the more affected electro prevailing lately. Thinking of the recent reminder of the dewy catchiness of Saint Etienne’s return, this duo has a similar energy without the London stamped postcode.

 Enjoy my second choice, ‘Lightspeed’ which I think is pushing all the buttons in a veritably ‘Visage’ musical gait with a nod to ‘Fade to Grey’ within the lyrics too.


Tracklist:

On The Run
Radio
Awake
Already Gone
The Nineties
Drive


Related Links:




*With thanks to Toni Hughes for the heads up*




Tuesday, 14 February 2012

Grimes- Visions- album review (release date March 12th)



I've been listening to Grimes for a while now and finally, she's making waves both sides of the Atlantic. This seems to have been down mostly to the great video ‘Vanessa’ from the EP last year ‘Darkbloom’ that earned her some well deserved blog recognition along with the quieter re-release of 2010’s Geidi Primes that I just love. 

So finally, Visions is here, well almost, for now it can be streamed online in all its beauty, a mark of how the music industry has changed over the last decade or so that you can do this before the official release.







After touring with Austra and now rumoured to be doing a track with Creep and promises of a making videos for every track off of Visions, Claire Boucher is clearly an artist who will churn out more treats.  All to come via visual, sound and artwork that already graces her many haunts online; a new and fearless talent that at the end of last year, I was really wanting to make a mark in 2012 and it looks so soon in, she already is.

So the album kicks off with ‘Infinite Love Without Fulfilment’, characteristically layered vocals and instrumentation that are her signature, effortlessly carrying across her range and influences as more of an introduction before going into 'Genesis', an absolute favourite of mine that echoes much of Geidi Primes in energy, sparkling synths and strong bass that hooks up beautifully with an oriental sound and rolling piano. What she seems to achieve repeatedly is very busy tunes that keep up momentum without jarring, individual and surprising in places without glitchy overkill.


‘Oblivian’ was the first single released and admittedly took a few listens for me, I think mostly as you can hear her love of certain RNB divas coming through in places but once you get over that, its another strong track. ‘Eight’ is a shorter track with slightly bonkers robotic voices, giving it an air of ‘lost in my own spaced out world’; very reminiscent of pioneering electro sounds but stamped with Boucherville. ‘Circumambient’ has a distinctly harder NIN intro and industrial start lightened with Claire’s vocals which you would kind of think shouldn’t work but blends with a strange almost girlish cheerleader air underlining what could sound like Mariah Carey being strangled; it works, trust me.


‘Vowels =Space and Time’ has a disco ball glow about it, all quite poppy but not, again with an edge of busy. ‘Visiting Statue’ starts a little more tribal with resounding beats and drum heaviness, her vocals a little lower showing off a range and pitch that is quite unmatched in its diversity over an album. The gorgeous layering in quite a succinct tune made me want more of it if I’m honest and undoubtedly will be another favourite that will go on repeat. ‘Be A Body’ initially reminded me of ‘Vanessa’ at first but again was full of instrumental surprises throughout and some fellow Canadian Austra percussive.

‘Colour Moonlight’ (Antiochus) is just lovely and has a touch of Prince’s  ‘When Doves Cry’ threading through showing how Grimes pulls influences from mainstream and maybe ‘not so’ in her unique cauldron of harmonies and resonating chatter. Symphonia IX (My Wait is U) starry intro and low intonation begins and is raised gently through a scale of music leaving you wondering quite where she starts when putting it all together. Her tracks bring the oddest of musical recollections at times from way back and current; with this one, there is a Depeche Mode feel in the latter half of the track but again her vocals dominate so that it could be missed. Or do they? Every part of the track dominates yet seems not to, at one point, you can even hear Cindy Lauper’s ‘Girls Just Wanna Have Fun’ fleetingly. All very unusual in a good way.

‘Nightmusic’ was my must listen all over New Year albeit a live version, it’s just perfection and the album version is slightly tweaked and buzzes a little more, it would be impossible not to like this one even if some of the tracks could be tagged with an acquired taste. ‘ Nightmusic’ ends with a quite lovely orchestral feel.

‘Skin’ bounces in quite unexpectedly and softer vocalising draws you in seductively, ignoring any kind of formulaic signature and taking you away with its charm; comeliness on first listen, it builds and builds and stands out in an album of tough competition of stand out tracks. Whispering allure to its end, you definitely feel the urge to put it straight back on.


The whole thing ends with ‘Know The Way’ and seems to wind down the album beautifully; a brilliant piece of work but having been loving the teasers for a few weeks now, it’s not surprising, yet it is. Grimes seduces, enchants, woos and bewilders and you would be equally as bonkers to pass this new talent by.  Simply lovelovelove Visions.  


Stream here : First Listen: Grimes Visions


Related Link:
Interview on Pitchfork

http://www.grimesmusic.com/

Rosemary, Crim3s and a new video from Au Palais...



Rosemary: A Persian Tale EP available now


Rosemary has perked up a rather quiet start to 2012 superbly, a Danish/Iranian boy/girl duo that have already been making a mark in Denmark (yes those who enjoyed Borgen and The Killing recently, Copenhagen is all the popular culture rage right now). They are currently enjoying a friendly push from the brilliant The Golden Filter covered here last year and rumours are cautiously surfacing already of collaborations.



Not surprisingly, the lead track  ‘Old Persian Tale’ will appeal to those that enjoyed the moody sounds of The Golden Filter ‘Syndromes’ EP and this also comes with a rather mysterious and darkly shot short film, jump here to watch the brilliance.For those impatient for some spine tingling sounds, the EP track version has less atmospheric pausing and more ‘oomph’ for want of a better word.

It is a great taster from a mix of six tracks that really do engage the pioneering sounds of Kraftwerk and New Order, but with diversity of female vocal range layered over the top and the filmic qualities of Blade Runner along with some Abba on helium; honestly, try out Sleep Alone’, brilliantly bonkers with echoes of ‘Lay All Your Love on Me’.

Download the EP ‘A Persian Tale’ for free here, the whole thing is a must listen.


http://www.rosemarymusic.net/





Crim3s- self-titled EP

Crim3s are channelling the energy of Crystal Castles rather impressively. High energy, ear bleedingly buzzy electronics and Alice Glass like reverberation and distorted vocals.  Definitely ones to keep an eye out for, it’s the sort of sound I prefer for summer for that festival feel but can hit the spot in the dark wintery months too. Don’t be put off by the sometimes pesky, sometimes misleading Witch House tag on these, it’s a troubled genre of symbolic gobbledegook that can hide some good stuff. . Listen to 'Breed' below...Wake up music.



The duo, Sadie Phelps and Sloww Ddeath (trying to be cool on this but to be honest, the teacher in me wants to grab a red pen and tell them off) also remixed the brilliant Crystal Castles ‘Intimate too…jump if you’re fan of this type of electronica then check out the glitchy promo here.


EP available on http://www.blackbusrecords.bigcartel.com/product/crim3s-ep




Au Palais- video for 'Tender Mercy'. 


And finally, the very lovely Au Palais’ ‘Tender Mercy’ title track from their impressive debut EP of last year finally has a video. Took rather too long but is prettily shot in and around an ironically merciless looking freezing Toronto. Enjoy the snowy scenes and somewhat pinched faces below…still a mesmerising tune with a video that was worth the wait.






http://aupalais.bandcamp.com/




Thursday, 9 February 2012

Being Human: Series 4. Big Fangs To Fill



So what did we think of 'Eve of the War'? (spoilers)



Correction, what I thought obviously. Yes Mitchell is no more, he had nowhere further to go, he was as dark as he could get, to turn him to the light and have a ‘Happily Ever After’ with Annie would have surely been even more irritating than seeing him crumble? Not a dry eye at the time but really, I'm not dwelling on it now.




And Annie poutless, not moping about her forever-empty womb or making everyone tea but… in love and smiling and somehow bonking the face off Mitchell would be hard to swallow. So a good character died, another good character left this week, and quite well done too; no off into the sunset with mummy and baby wolf there either but some sort of weird moon poster suggestion that left him in limbo between wolf and man with no repair kit.  Nowhere to go but through that door. It’s a supernatural drama, not a fairy tale so in my mind, the loss of people is par for the course.


And yes ‘quit while you’re ahead’ springs to mind but at the same time, those crying over the loss of main characters would probably complain if it hadn’t come back too, onwards and upwards I say. Fingers crossed.






It opened with some horrid looking ‘New World Order’ that was hinted at by Herrick in series 3. Landing in futuristic London briefly with a fatal message to say New York was down so the world surely next then. (Why New York? I found that jarring as it's all been so local up until now, Bristol or Bath would have done) Some mysterious lady was involved, it all looked a little military, a little fascistic but with blood suckers at the helm. Something here stank of Doctor Who too, another one you could shout ‘stop before you die in shame’ at, but imagine the loss of that institution. Again. I felt a bit worried at this point, too much TV lately doing the dystopic future thing, erm? ‘Misfits’.


Nina had been put to sleep (loving the dog metaphors as always) and then there was a super cute baby, surrounded by crucifixes and guarded by the angry but tearful George wielding a wooden stake. And Annie fussing. 








The inevitable social services and police presence, a few clips to some parallel like existence of another threesome of ‘ghost, werewolf and vampire’ living together that somehow haven’t heard about the other quirky but not really house share and a dangling of new vampire, ‘Hal’ to replace Mitchell; big fangs to fill then.




He looked promising I thought and not a directly obvious fill in, i.e. another bit of vamp totty in a good leather jacket with the ability to look like a smiley charmer and brutal killer in seconds… but a decidedly more classic vampirey style (kind of 'True Blood's 'Bill Compton to look at, all quiet and strength) His character? Hard to tell from these short clips but let’s give the guy a chance. What was that ghost lady…so far another domesticated wet blanket, not unlike Annie but in a fifties outfit? Is she staying? All have to ‘wait and sees’.


The new werewolf  'Tom'? Well I liked him in the Series 3 so no problem there either. Overall, pleasantly surprising with a few flaws and a little messy in places but the first episode of anything making a tricky comeback will go overkill on the drama and please, please give it a chance plots. 




The biggest criticism for me was the lack of immediacy of Nina's death, a gruesome flashback of her demise just to add some more grief might have been good. It was also a pity about the short-lived baddie ‘Windham’ (Did both feel the gamble fear and get better offers perhaps?) and the Vampire policeman that copped it spent most of the episode method acting ‘Herrick’ which was a little annoying.  I do like Toby Whithouse’s fearless killing off though, it keeps up the momentum even if it is sometimes dictated by the actors themselves.

Good work. Chink of glasses for more supernaturally fabness then.


Jump to iplayer to catch up.
Being Human website


Related Post:
The Final Act



Friday, 3 February 2012

Book Review: Before I Go To Sleep - SJ Watson

Tagged ‘Crime Thriller of the Year’ in 2011, ‘Before I Go To Sleep’ is based around amnesia and its mystery. It has been compared to films like ‘Inception’, ’50 First Dates’ and ‘Groundhog Day’, however, these could be seen as quite superficial comparisons really.


As I've said before, I am curious about how memories are linked to identity. Recollection ability that can only take on a day in your life is a minefield with lost people from your reality. Your mind wiped on waking each morning, personally does feel me with dread, especially as I find forgetfulness inconvenient enough.




The book, mostly well received as a debut novel, has come into some criticism for flimsier aspects of its ‘science’ although I think the story is gripping enough to overlook details of sketchy healthcare once a patient is discharged. To be honest, I can see how mistakes could be made and how someone pretty determined could trip up the system.

Without too many spoilers then, very simply the book is the story of Chrissie, an amnesiac who has suffered some sort of accident (avoiding spoilers here) as a younger woman that has left her unable to process memories beyond one day; on sleeping she wakes each morning not knowing who she is, who her husband is, where she lives and exists on a daily basis having to re learn her identity and sadly, to lose it again.

For her husband, and the only medical expert she conspiratorially sees through most of the story, Doctor Nash, and for us the reader, this does involve a lot of repetition as the story unfolds in an increasingly unsettling way. I didn’t have too much of a problem with this though as it does give the story a claustrophobic credibility, hemmed in by her dependence on really two main people, her husband and her doctor, to tell her who she is and also their combined frustration at times for having to relive minor and even mundane details.


I did feel for her constant dilemma over whether to trust her husband, as it is clear from the beginning that something is not as it seems. He appears to care and deceive (or mislead for her own good), as does the doctor. At times, she questions even what she herself reads in her journal as a possible ‘fiction’ in her head and you do kind of reel between the three in various levels of disbelief, belief and general perplexing disorientation.  Criticisms of the structure in the novel from some, for me personally, helped in creating identification with her own murky loss of events and people at points.

You also inevitably question the validity of her doctor and get pulled into her confusion and paranoia when she has no real foundation of which to make a judgement from. The start of her journal to document her days and an almost instinctive need for her to keep it hidden lends well to there being a remaining modicum of her own sense of ‘self’. 

This is further backed by her delicate sense of knowing she is a mother despite the discrepancies in her mind and what those tell her about it. As she gets better at remembering small details and almost seems to ‘exercise’ her brain to pull up details, mostly from trauma, it gives some hope, if at times dashed by the muddied waters of memory that can twist and distort, even invent inaccuracies, and even by the most efficient accounts of recall.

I think SJ Watson did a good job of keeping up the consistency of someone with no memory, highlighting things in everyday life we take for granted with regarding it. I liked the strangely small suburban setting, in some ways the ordinariness of how she lives makes it all the more believable and gives it a provincial sinister feel despite being set in London. Although there were a few pointers that were a little too revealing from the start, the big twist at the end did elude me, I kind of guessed it but not quite. You feel there’s a building of tension and know something horrific is going to be revealed, or is intended for Chrissie, but it is mostly just out of grasp as you read it.

My main criticism would be that the last part was rather rushed and although I can see the ending could frustrate finality fetishists; I liked the uncertainty and preservation of the fragility of the human memory. And to end on a positive note, I think SJ Watson wrote from a female perspective and in the first person with uncanny authenticity…well done him. A worthwhile read.





Previous Book Review


A Sense of An Ending - by Julian Barnes


Wednesday, 1 February 2012

Miike Snow, Lykke Li, Me And My Drummer and Purity Ring

Miike Snow ft Lykke Li – Black Tin Box



Time for music again, ignoring the beeb’s ‘Birdsong’ as it was fluff  soooo blog travels back to Scandinavia again via Miike Snow ft Lykke Li, who I love, and ‘Black Tin Box’. It’s an unusual track really and rather epic in length that seems all the rage right now.

Miike Snow isn’t a bloke that can’t spell but actually a trio of superproducers (that I’ve never heard of admittedly) Christian Karlsson, Pontus Winnberg (aka Bloodshy and Avent) and Andrew Wyatt. You can listen here, it has something of an Andersson ‘Knifey’ charm, strong bass, whooshy space age noise and drums that remind me of something that eludes me right now (one commenter mentions Peter Gabriel) My only criticism is, there’s just not enough Lykke in there and beware if you like bands to have consistently similar sounds throughout an album, they don't. I quite like the unpredictability of it all.

An album is due out in March 27 ‘Happy to You’ via Downtown/Universal Republic and will be worth checking out.  They have also some, erm, barely recognise the original remixes of a couple of tracks from Depeche Mode’s early albums, most notably for me 1981’s Speak and Spell and ‘ Tora, Tora Tora, it’s a bit bonkers but kind of captivates for the whole seven and a half minutes.

And this gives me the perfect excuse to share this rather lovely live preview of Lykke Li doing one of the best tracks from her ‘Wounded Rhymes’ on the American music show ‘Austin City Limits’, I suppose their version of Joolz but of course, bigger. A year later her second album is still sounding good.


Lykke Li "Sadness is a Blessing" from Austin City Limits on Vimeo.





Me And My Drummer - You're a Runner (debut single) 

Another repeat listen recently has been German duo ‘Me and My Drummer’ Charlotte Brandi and Matze Prollochs with the debut single ‘You’re a Runner’, just loveliness. Charlotte’s vocal range easing over some Kate Bush or more recently Niki & the Dove style drumming really makes it in the latter half of the track. Listen below and keep an eye out for more, I will be. For peeps that like The Do, it has a similar energy.




You're A Runner by Me And My Drummer from Sinnbus on Vimeo.




Purity Ring - Lofticries/Belispeak


Purity Ring is another quite lovely boy/girl duo that started making waves last year. Although these newbies don't have any official videos yet, this Fader live clip is rather good quality. It took me a little while to pinpoint what it reminded me of, but perhaps a little obscurely and ironically as the tag themselves 'future pop', it's a lesser know Communards track 'For A Friend' from 1988.




There's just something similar in parts of the instrumentals of 'Lofticries' that capture the same melancholic air contrasting to the sometimes stark and cold electronics in the other beep laden bands. Megan James' vocals are captivating and ghostly in places along with some  percussion from band mate Corin Roddick. Ones to watch as they say...jump on the soundcloud for 'Belispeak'.


Related Posts:

Lykke Li- Wounded Rhymes- Album Review
The Do- Both Ways Open Jaws


Related Links:

http://www.miikesnow.com/
http://www.meandmydrummer.blogspot.com/
http://thepurityring.tumblr.com/
http://lykkeli.com/